Human heart found on train's cow-catcher




The following article, which appeared in the Allentown Democrat on March 21, 1894, describes the dangers of falling asleep on a railroad track used by a high-speed passenger train:



A BLOOD SPATTERED LOCOMOTIVE- GHASTLY DISCOVERY- HUMAN HEART FOUND ON A PILOT

A man's heart was found wedfed between the bars of the cow-catcher of the engine of a New Jersey Central passenger train when it pulled into the Jersey Central Station here on Wednesday night. The train is the evening flyer, and runs from New York to Allentown in about two hours. It is made to speed at a terrific rate across the level plains of New Jersey. The crew consists of Jerry Goodwin, engineer, W.E. Creveling, fireman, and David Funk, conductor, all of this city. They knew of no accident until they arrived at Glendon, this side of Easton, when they received a dispatch from Somerville saying that track walkers had found a dismembered corpse between that place and Bound Brook. Time was precious and the train had to proceed. The ghastly find was made when the train was inspected at the end of its run in this city. The pilot was spattered with blood, and besides the heart on the pilot the victim's liver was discovered lying on the front of the engine. The man was probably lying, either drunk or asleep, on the track when struck in New Jersey. The remains were unrecognizable.

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